Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Lawrence Gold's Murder Mystery, Rage, Leaves Reader Stumped!

Traffic congestion, Rio de Janeiro(Leme), Brazil
Traffic congestion, Rio de Janeiro(Leme), Brazil (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
"The EMTs carefully lifted the bloodied driver onto a portable gurney stretch then into the ambulance and drove away while Carrie stood handcuffed next to the policeman... A woman stood crying before another police officer "He cut in front of her, and I'd say she lost it, except she was like a zombie. I couldn't believe it. Her
face was expressionless, and her eyes looked funny."
"Funny?" the officer asked.
"They jerked back and forth, sideways. It was weird, and
then she smashd the tire iron against the car window and
kept striking even as the window shattered. It was awful. That poor man. Blood was everywhere. My God, his little
daughter was in the car and saw everything..."
"He turned to his partner. "We're gonna need some other name for this. Road rage ain't going to cover it."
~~~


Rage

By Lawrence W. Gold, M.D.


Many of us who hear the word Rage will automatically tie it to "road rage." Indeed one of the incidents in this third novel I read this weekend, was by a woman sitting in traffic, trying to drop her kids off at school, late, and some fool tries to cut in front of her to deal with his own business first! Ok, that would make most of us mad right? Especially if the rest of that morning hadn't been going well... But should it have been sufficient cause to take a tire iron to the man?

Then there was Beverly Craig who had stopped along the road to help a family with car trouble. After he helped them and the man turned to thank him, he saw Craig's tongue protruded, his eyes jerking side-to-side, staring ahead. He had a blade in his hand and thrust it deep into the victim's abdomen...then turned to his screaming wife... Then went home and murdered his wife...
"A middle-age redheaded woman looked up at the
priest and smiled. Ware's face remained impassive
as he reached through his cape and extracted a
Glock 23, pointed it at the woman's forehead and
pulled the trigger.
"The sanctuary resounded with the blast as the
woman's head exploded, and blood erupted and
splattered over the priest's alb, face, and the shocked
spectators nearby. She lay on the floor in a puddle of
bright blood blending incongruously with her red hair.
"The sanctuary smelled of gunpowder and resounded
with anguished cries and weeping.
"Mary wiped her face and stared at the blood on her
hands. "Oh my God, my Lord. Someone call 911."
~~~
When a priest finished his latest service and then walked down into his congregation, shooting one of the women through the head... it was really important that the cause of what was happening be found!

This murder mystery not only needs to solve "Who?" which is very evident in reality... But, how, what, why, and the who behind it all must be determined!

When another incident occurred at the university as Erin Stuart was attacked by her roommate Jennifer Davis, it was the first real information that was obtained. Erin knew almost immediately that something was wrong with Jennifer and described her actions. Erin was able to defend herself, save her own life, and then refused to charge Jennifer even though they had admitted her to a locked psychiatric unit.

Dr. Michael Rose and his assistant worked with the police and conducted much of the investigation, interviewing those that had committed the attacks...

None of them had any memory of what they had done...

It wasn't until close to the very end that I was able to pick up on who was behind all of this. Wow! I love it when a writer makes it so hard that I can't solve the crime. But you much admit that this is also a unique plot--a number of unrelated individuals turning violent, with no known background of mental issues and no memory of the crimes they committed...

You'll even find out the "how" and it won't help!

Dr. Gold, You Rock! This is a great mystery!


GABixlerReviews


Lawrence W. Gold, M.D.

I practiced internal medicine and nephrology (diseases of the kidney) in Berkeley, California for twenty-three years. I was an active participant in his hospital’s quality assurance program that monitored physician performance. In addition, I served as chief of the department of medicine and family practice.

My wife, Dorlis and I retired and set sail to cruise Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. We are back on land in Grass Valley, California.

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