Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Mixed Feelings About Cave Kiddos and A Sunny Day

When I first saw this book, I figured it would be something like stories that help children learn basics...such as The Ten Little Indians teaches counting... The blurb reflected no special statement about its audience, if that was indeed intended. It was only after I read a review on Amazon which had given a low rating that I learned that the book "might" be for learning disabled children... Logically, my next thought was about whether this should be specifically shared before you buy the book? There are pros and cons, I am sure;  but I tend to go toward letting the potential buyer know in advance. You know...something like, Cave Kiddos-Helping Delayed Speakers...

The book is centered on a group of cave kids who would, at that time, be learning or creating a language. In this case, they are discovering water and that you drink it. One child cries Waaa! - whether he just cried out or whether it was what it had been called before,  we do not know...


The first page says Remember to talk and act like a Cave Kiddo showing a club...

Ok, if a child has a learning disability, then responding to that statement will require an adult to teach them how to act like a cave kiddo... If the child would already know that...then the rest of the book, in my opinion, is too elementary--there is only one word that is taught in the book...

I think the father and author Eric Jay Cash has a strong and wonderful desire to create something special for the speech and development learning of children. And the effort in putting together this book is obvious. There certainly would be a need for books that are attractive and will draw the attention of children. However, without experience other than my own, I am aware that most children are so different in this wide spectrum of challenges that it would be impossible to provide the needs for more than one or two specific children.

It seems to me using books that are routinely available, could be selected with the importance placed on the illustrations, and that the child should be challenged and guided through the use of those books, with help as needed.

This book would be delightful for picture oriented children of any age, but mainly in very early ages. I must say that this review is mainly my own personal opinion. The book itself does not help readers, in making a decision as to its usability for children of early ages, without making assumptions as to its intent and for which child it would benefit. I think that is a problem.

In the end, I do come back to my original thought, I do not recommend the book. Now I will add if it is being considered for a challenged child,  except as chosen for a specific child, as decided by the parent or relative.


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